Showing posts with label reporting. Show all posts
Showing posts with label reporting. Show all posts

Friday, February 9, 2024

Reporting

If you attend general meetings of different organizations, and if you hold any portfolio position, then you may need to provide a written report of activity for the area you oversee.

Reporting about the activity of the area of management under your portfolio ensures that there is accountability, and the opportunity to ask for assistance, or additional resources for the daily oversight of the area/programs/activities.

Ensure the correct reporting period is clearly shown on the report, along with who is reporting, and position, and what the report is about.

Gather any information from your team, collected information and data, and clients that you know need to be included for reporting. 


Example 1: a sports club coach may include the number of players across each age group, the number of games played in the reporting period, and any incidents, equipment required, or upcoming training events that require funding.

Example 2: a manager of a Not-For-Profit retail area may include the number of employees or volunteers, how much stock was put through the retail for the reporting period, any incidents/sick leave/staff rotation issues, what maintenance is required in the retail section and how much profit/loss with a breakdown of income and expenses.

Read through your report for typing errors, and to ensure it is concise and clear when reading.

You may also like to include a summary of recommendations/issues to be addressed at the end of your report – this helps the minute secretary and the other portfolio managers when they are looking for your recommendations.

Don’t forget to submit your report by the required date and to the correct person/s.

One last tip! Ensure you have a copy (either printed/digital) with you for the meeting so that you can easily refer to recommendations/notes/points that others in the meeting ask you.


Friday, February 2, 2024

Prepare for your meeting

How do you feel when you are rushing to a meeting with sticky notes, and pieces of paper flying about, and you are looking for a pen that works!  We know that this is NO way to be prepared to go into a meeting.  When you are rushed, ill-prepared, and do not have the information you need on hand, the meeting will be a disaster of distress, frustration, and unmet expectations.

How can you be prepared so that the above-mentioned situation is not what you are dealing with? Simply, be prepared – get organized!

1.   Schedule time in the days preceding the meeting to read through all material sent.

2.   Have your agenda ready (printed/digital) and ensure you have advised the person assigned to prepare the agenda; any items you want to have included for discussion.

3.      Read through any reports prior to the meeting and have your notes/questions ready.

4.  Read through the previous minutes, noting anything you are supposed to have completed (and ensure it’s done).

5.      If you are bringing items to the meeting for discussion, have your notes and research collated.

6.      Have your pen and paper ready, or your digital device (and ensure it is charged).

7.      Be well hydrated and rested.

These are some simple steps that you can take to help be prepared for an upcoming meeting.  Entering a meeting feeling calm and confident, with the correct materials on hand, will assist you in communicating through the discussions that will take place and working towards amicable, achievable decisions.



Friday, June 9, 2023

Concise Reporting

Many people think that if they use long, flowery sentences then their writing will be more appreciated.  However, in our busy, information-filled daily life, many people appreciate someone who provides concise, clear information.


What does concise mean?  From the Mirriam-Webster dictionary, concise is explained as, "marked by brevity of expression or statement: free from all elaboration and superfluous detail".

For example, when writing a progress report, keep your information clear, accurate, and concise. The information presented should relate to the assigned portfolio position and provide accountability and progress to those to whom the report will be presented to.

You may choose to use tables, dot points, or main headings with key points following. Something I have learned in a new N-F-P role recently is to have a summary at the end of my report providing succinct points and recommendations for the upcoming meeting.



Whatever way you choose to present your information to an audience, board, or employer, having your information clear and concise will enable those reading the important points required to review and make decisions, without spending extended periods reading and trying to gather data and facts.